Sunday, July 8, 2012

2 Microarray Analyses of Inflammation Response of Human Dermal Fibroblasts to Different Strains of B. burgdorferi S.S.

This interesting abstract just got posted on PubMed and is in PLoSONE:

Microarray Analyses of Inflammation Response of Human Dermal Fibroblasts to Different Strains of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto

Schramm F, Kern A, Barthel C, Nadaud S, Meyer N, Jaulhac B, Boulanger N.

Abstract

In Lyme borreliosis, the skin is the key site of bacterial inoculation by the infected tick, and of cutaneous manifestations, erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. We explored the role of fibroblasts, the resident cells of the dermis, in the development of the disease.

Using microarray experiments, we compared the inflammation of fibroblasts induced by three strains of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto isolated from different environments and stages of Lyme disease: N40 (tick), Pbre (erythema migrans) and 1408 (acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans).

The three strains exhibited a similar profile of inflammation with strong induction of chemokines (CXCL1 and IL-8) and IL-6 cytokine mainly involved in the chemoattraction of immune cells. Molecules such as TNF-alpha and NF-κB factors, metalloproteinases (MMP-1, -3 and -12) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2), also described in inflammatory and cellular events, were up-regulated.

In addition, we showed that tick salivary gland extracts induce a cytotoxic effect on fibroblasts and that OspC, essential in the transmission of Borrelia to the vertebrate host, was not responsible for the secretion of inflammatory molecules by fibroblasts.

Tick saliva components could facilitate the early transmission of the disease to the site of injury creating a feeding pit. Later in the development of the disease, Borrelia would intensively multiply in the skin and further disseminate to distant organs.

Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22768217

Comments:

Take note of that last paragraph:
"Tick saliva components could facilitate the early transmission of the disease to the site of injury creating a feeding pit. Later in the development of the disease, Borrelia would intensively multiply in the skin and further disseminate to distant organs."
Do you think the implications of the above fit in nicely with the mathematical modeling of Borrelia burgdorferi infection cycles mentioned in an earlier entry?

Why or why not?

See:

Abstract: Population Dynamics Of Borrelia burgdorferi In Lyme Disease
http://campother.blogspot.com/2012/04/abstract-population-dynamics-of.html

The implications - for me at least - seem to fit a model where the first wave of infection dies off but then a bigger, immune-resistant subpopulation explodes onto the scene (the site of infection).

Awaiting PLoSONE to publish the full text so I can give a more thorough analysis...



2 comments:

  1. CO,

    I took the liberty of posting this on LNE because I thought others would also find it very interesting.

    Unfortunately, my brain isn't working well enough at the moment to respond to your "Why or why not?" question, but I'll try to read the articles again later today or tomorrow.

    ReplyDelete

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